April 15, 2024

Oliver Pikus

Progressive Solutions

Disaster Recovery: Critical to Business Continuity

Introduction

We’ve all heard the saying that it’s better to be safe than sorry. But what does it mean for businesses? It means that you should always have a disaster recovery plan in place just in case something goes wrong. A disaster is any event beyond the normal scope of operations that can cause damage and/or disruption in your organization. Likelihood of a disaster occurring and its impact on an organization vary greatly depending on their industry, location and the type of business they’re in. Natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes are considered acts of God and are random events that cannot be predicted or prevented. Man-made disasters such as terrorist attacks, fires, employee mistakes and environmental hazards are more predictable but still difficult to prevent

Disaster recovery is critical to a business’ ability to survive and continue operating as usual.

A business cannot survive without its data, so it is critical to have a backup plan in place when disaster strikes. Disaster recovery is about more than just data; it’s also about the people and processes that make up your organization. You need to ensure that you are able to recover from any downtime or interruption of service due to an unplanned event such as fire, flood or theft; natural disasters like hurricanes; hardware failure; hacking attempts; human error (such as accidentally deleting files); etc.

The term disaster refers to any event beyond the normal scope of operations that can cause damage and/or disruption in your organization.

The term disaster refers to any event beyond the normal scope of operations that can cause damage and/or disruption in your organization. Disasters can be natural or man-made, predictable or unpredictable, local, regional or global in their impact on an organization. The most common types of disasters include:

  • Fire
  • Floods (including flash floods)
  • Storms
  • Earthquakes/Tsunamis/Volcanoes

Likelihood of a disaster occurring and its impact on an organization vary greatly depending on their industry, location and the type of business they’re in.

The likelihood of a disaster occurring and its impact on an organization vary greatly depending on their industry, location and the type of business they’re in.

For example:

  • The likelihood of a disaster occurring in your industry is high because you manufacture airplanes or train cars. If there were an earthquake in California where you are based, it could damage your facility and shut down operations for months at a time. You may need to relocate temporarily while repairs are made to your building or equipment.
  • The consequences of such an event would be devastating because without transportation systems running properly there would be no way for customers who need new vehicles (or parts) immediately after purchasing them from you–and being unable to deliver those items could mean losing millions upon millions of dollars per day until everything gets back up again!

Natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes are considered acts of God and are random events that cannot be predicted or prevented.

Natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes are considered acts of God and are random events that cannot be predicted or prevented. The term disaster refers to any event beyond the normal scope of operations that can cause damage and/or disruption in your organization. Likelihood of a disaster occurring and its impact on an organization vary greatly depending on their industry, location and the type of business they’re in.

Disaster recovery planning is an essential part of Business Continuity Planning (BCP) because it focuses on how you will recover from a disaster situation so that you can resume business operations quickly with minimal downtime or loss of revenue while maintaining confidentiality, integrity and availability (CIA) standards for information systems

Man-made disasters such as terrorist attacks, fires, employee mistakes and environmental hazards are more predictable but still difficult to prevent.

Man-made disasters are more predictable, but still difficult to prevent. They include terrorist attacks, fires, employee mistakes and environmental hazards like earthquakes and floods.

Man-made disasters can be prevented to some degree through careful planning and training. While you cannot control the weather or Mother Nature’s wrath, you can take steps to reduce your risk of damage in case of a man-made disaster:

  • Conduct regular safety inspections of equipment and facilities.
  • Create an evacuation plan that includes procedures for employees who work remotely or outside normal business hours (e.g., remote workers).
  • Train employees on how best to react during an emergency situation so they know what steps they need to take before calling 911–or even before dialing 9-1-1!

The longer it takes for a company to return to normal operations after a disaster, the more likely it is that they will go out of business completely.

The longer it takes for a company to return to normal operations after a disaster, the more likely it is that they will go out of business completely. The disaster recovery plan is critical to your business continuity and should be developed before any crisis occurs. When developing your DRP, you must include all potential disasters such as fire or flood–even if these events have never occurred in your area before.

By developing an effective DRP now, you can minimize losses during times of crisis by knowing how much time it will take for you and/or your vendors (e.g., Internet service provider) before they can restore services back up again so that customers can access their websites/apps again without experiencing any downtime at all!

A business can’t survive without its data

Data is the lifeblood of a business. It’s how you keep track of your customers, maintain inventory and manage finances. Without access to your data, you can’t do business. Data also gives you an edge over competitors by providing insight into what they’re doing wrong, or right–and how you can use that knowledge in order to gain market share.

Data has become so important that it’s often referred to as “raw material” for companies: What makes one company unique from another? The answer lies in its data–it makes each company unique because no two organizations have exactly identical information about their customers and products/services offered (or needed).

Conclusion

Disaster recovery is critical to a business’ ability to survive and continue operating as usual. The term disaster refers to any event beyond the normal scope of operations that can cause damage and/or disruption in your organization. Likelihood of a disaster occurring and its impact on an organization vary greatly depending on their industry, location and the type of business they’re in. Natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes are considered acts of God and are random events that cannot be predicted or prevented. Man-made disasters such as terrorist attacks, fires, employee mistakes and environmental hazards are more predictable but still difficult to prevent.”